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Extremes Environments

Unusual rock landscapes are distinctive. Bizarre rock formations are twisted and contorted depicting an ancient story of thousands of years of erosion by wind and water. Memories from seeing some of the vast and unique formations in Bolivia inspired thoughts of how weathering and geological processes have sculptured such beauty. It was rock art. Rock Tree (Arbol de... Continue Reading →

Earth’s Romantic Past

Let’s mix up some ‘Cenozoic’ for a little adventure. Making fossils is not only fun but also a creative way for kids to learn about paleontology. A dash of plaster, paper cups and various objects, paints and colour pens does the trick. I find students have a particular fascination with fossils and exploring Earth’s species... Continue Reading →

Enchanted Classroom

The museum is such a great place to inspire learning, I think of them as ‘an enchanted classroom’. Even if the logistics of getting to a museum is difficult, there are often great resources available on their websites, catered primarily for teachers and school curriculums. New Zealand Museums While at teacher’s college, I naturally spent... Continue Reading →

Beyond Planet Earth

3,2,1 lift off!  A significant component of the new science curriculum engages students interests in space. I often found students fascinated by this topic - it inspires some imagination and philosophical questioning. What really is out there? Just how big is our universe? New Zealand has a number of planetariums and tours that are run... Continue Reading →

Volcanic Hot Spots

Geological time frame is not always easy for students to conceptualise. In fact, drafting maps and diagrams is a great start, along with the use of analogies. I remember being told by my teacher, that plate tectonics move at about the speed that your fingernails grow, which is actually the plate tectonic movement in New... Continue Reading →

Wetland Wonders

I think wetlands deserve some recognition. Although a little removed from the blog’s hot spot activity on tectonic forces, it’s still connected to the process. I have always been intrigued to see the Everglades National Park in Florida. Accredited as being the first national park for the protection of an ecological wilderness in the USA,... Continue Reading →

Shaky Scars

Are destructive earthquakes still predicted to happen in Christchurch? Apparently. Cantabrians have had their overdose of earthquake experiences. The emotional scars have run deeper than the physical scars in many cases. It was just by chance that during my time back in Christchurch over the Easter break that the Christchurch Community Response Team (CCR) knocked... Continue Reading →

Rock ‘n’ Roll

The Earth knows how to rock and roll. Tragedy hit Ecuador last Saturday with an earthquake of 7.8 magnitude. It’s unavoidable - the power of geological forces struck, taking over 500 lives and injuring over 4000 people. Such devastation. I was in Ecuador three months ago and discovered a beautiful country with a poor economy. Now... Continue Reading →

A century later

How often have you enjoyed the wonders of a national park? Is it time to get outside for some R & R with nature? After all, it is the centennial since America began the National Park movement, with the support of the National Geographic Society. In fact, it is National Park Week, allowing free admission to 127 parks in... Continue Reading →

Legends in the Rocks

Myths and legends are such an inviting way to learn about the landscape. It may not always been scientific, but that doesn’t have to matter. Often of great cultural significance, the story remains with us. It’s another way to respect nature. Storytelling can be an inspirational way to teach geology – it’s the legends in the... Continue Reading →

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